Glossary

  • Growth Hacking

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    Growth: the process of developing or maturing physically, mentally. Hacking: the opposite of growth.

  • Methodolatry

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    Methodolatry: An intense affection for process over results and outcomes.

  • Dikinomics

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    Dikinomics: Consumer-hostile practices that prioritize short-term profits over everything else, even when the benefits of doing otherwise are apparent.

  • Innobator

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    Innobator: someone who promotes themselves as an expert on innovation by calling attention to someone else’s innovation.

  • Innurbation

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    The act of innovating for the sake of it, or introducing something as new even if it’s not. See also, innurbator – a person who perceives themselves as innovative by calling attention to other peoples’ creativity and inventions.

  • TED

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    A person who is all ideas and no implementation. The acronym TED stands for Totally Enthralling Demagogue. TEDs are good at describing idealistic future scenarios unencumbered by minor details of execution. A TED can also be anyone who speaks in public using a headset.

  • Shimware

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    Programs written specifically to make programming easier or simpler. Usually it involves some kind of kludge or requires the person to adopt some new convention. The promise of Shimware is the user will never have to learn the specific programming language it generates. Some examples: coffeescript compass, SASS, LESS Gems

  • Unnovating

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    1. Solving the new problems created by solving the old problem. verb 2. Creating solutions after creating the problem.  

  • Methodolatry

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    Demonstrating an intense and deep affection for process over results and outcomes. “Tobias’ is such an asshole. He thinks I don’t understand his ‘process’, but it’s his methodaltry getting in the way of understanding what we’re trying to do!”

  • Dikinomics

    /

    The effects of extensive and deliberate retrenching by organizations intended to undermine customer gratification. The act of prioritizing all business needs of an organization over everything else, even when the benefits of doing otherwise are apparent. “Tobias’  decision to charge a $6 convenience fee tickets ordered online came down to a matter of dikinomics.”